Misintent : Hazing Students | Mental Health

Notice:  This piece was selected for publishing as an open opinion piece by an unaffiliated contributor.


How is what YOU do, in any way similar to fraternity/sorority HAZING? Before you say “in NO way!”…stop and reflect a little.

I know, not all fraternity “hazing” ends in death, though it is now illegal in California. But no matter how benign it seems, having to jump a lot of hurdles in order to GAIN ACCESS, is a problem for people seeking mental health treatment…or even getting the listening ear of a friend or parent.

Can we prevent the emotional/social pain sometimes inflicted on someone SEEKING ACCESS? Getting access to faith-based or mental health services, to school counselors, to peers or even distracted parents, can sometimes feel like “hazing”…the things we are asked to do, the price we are asked to pay.

How bad does someone want or need access? To what extent are hurdles placed in the way to find out “how high they will jump”? Some people “do what they are told”…are they considered fools (even by those whose services they seek) for not knowing when to stop seeking?

This Atlantic story is sad, but thought provoking.

Checkout: UNAFFILIATED ARTICLE ON THE NEWS STORY

It brings to my mind, another old story about a woman seeking help for her ill daughter, which suggests that even caregivers can learn from care seekers. Her daughter dying, the woman bowed down before the healer (as required by custom) and begged him to help her. His first response was, “It’s not good to take the children’s bread and throw it to the dogs.”, meaning…he’s only going to heal the really sick people, and those who are in my neighborhood, so to speak. To that, she said, “Yes, but even the dogs feed on the crumbs which fall from their owners’ tables.”. Comparing herself with hungry dogs seemed to make a difference. With that, he said, “Your faith is great and it shall be done for you as you wish.” And he healed her daughter at once.

I know scripture readers might argue with my interpretation here, but my point is, even Jesus felt he was only there for certain people and she had to do a little cajoling to get what SHE BELIEVED HE COULD DO. Compassionate or convicted – either way you interpret it – the healer, healed.

But why did she have to beg first? Did he know before she even started the conversation that he was going to help her? Was he “hazing” her a little? Did she have to prove her faith in him first? Or did he have to find her “worthy” of his time? Or did the “hazing” actually show him that his “treatment” was going to work on her prepared/faithful soul? Maybe there was another way to get THAT information…

In the end, she had her daughter back, healthy and whole. I wonder how SHE felt after that conversation. Of course, she felt grateful to the healer for his work. But I wonder if SHE felt healthy and whole, too.

 

“Advocate for mental health. Work to end STIGMA of mental illness.”

 

101 Fantastic Ideas for Students when Feeling College is TOO MUCH

I think that, for most of us, there are times in life when it all just feels like Too Much. Can you say #SelfCare?

There may be some days, weeks, months, maybe even years when — for whatever reason — just getting through the day or going to work or putting one foot in front of the other feels hard. Really, really hard.


Maybe it’s because you’re wrestling with anxiety, depression, or some other mental illness.

Maybe it’s because you’ve had your heart broken. Maybe you’ve gone through a physical or emotional trauma. Maybe you’re deeply grieving. Or maybe there’s no easily understood reason for why you’re feeling bad.

Whatever the case, I want you to know that it’s OK if you’re going through a tough time.

This doesn’t make you any less lovable, worthy, or capable. This just means you’re human. Being a human can be a messy, hard, confusing, painful experience sometimes.

So if you or someone you love is going through one of these tough times right now, a time where it all just feels like too much, I want to offer up 101 suggestions for self-care to help you or your loved one get through this time.

Photo via iStock.

1. Have a good, long, body-shaking cry.

2. Call a trusted friend or family member and talk it out.

3. Call in sick. Take comp time if you can. Take a mental health day.

4. Say no to extra obligations, chores, or anything that pulls on your precious self-care time.

5. Book a session (or more!) with your therapist.

6. Dial down your expectations of yourself at this time. When you’re going through life’s tough times, I invite you to soften your expectations of yourself and others.

7. Tuck yourself into bed early with a good book and clean sheets.

8. Watch a comforting/silly/funny/lighthearted TV show or movie. (“Parks and Recreation,” anyone?)

9. Reread your favorite picture and chapter books from childhood.

10. Ask for some love and tenderness from your friends on social media. Let them comment on your post and remind you that you’re loved.

11. Look at some some really gorgeous pieces of art.

12. Watch YouTube videos of Ellen DeGeneres and the adorable kids she has on her show.

13. Look at faith-in-humanity-restoring lists from around the internet.

14. Ask for help. From whomever you need it — your boss, your doctor, your partner, your therapist, your mom. Let people know you need some help.

15. Wrap yourself up in a cozy fleece blanket and sip a cup of hot tea.

16. Breathe. Deeply. Slowly. Four counts in. Six counts out.

17. Hydrate. Have you had enough water today?

18. Eat. Have you eaten something healthy and nourishing today?

19. Sleep. Have you slept seven to nine hours? Is it time for some rest?

20. Shower. Then dry your hair and put on clothes that make you feel good.

21. Go outside and be in the sunshine.

22. Move your body gently in ways that feel good. Maybe aim for 30 minutes. Or 10 minutes if 30 feels like too much.

23. Read a story (or stories) of people who overcame adversity or maybe dealt with mental illness, too. (I personally admire J.K. Rowling’s story.)

24. Go to a 12-step meeting. Or any group meeting where support is offered. Check out church listings, hospital listings, or school listings, for example.

25. If you suspect something may be physiologically off with you, go see your doctor and/or psychiatrist and talk to them. Medication might help you at this time, and professionals can assist you in assessing this.

26. Take a long, hot bath. Light a candle and pamper yourself.

27. Read inspirational quotes.

28. Cuddle someone or something. Your partner. A pillow. Your friend’s dog.

29. Read previous emails, postcards, letters, etc. from friends and family reminding you of happier times.

30. Knit. Sculpt. Bake. Engage your hands.

31. Exhaust yourself physically — running, yoga, swimming, whatever helps you feel fatigued.

32. Write it out. Go free-form in a journal or on a computer. Get it all out and vent.

33. Create a plan if you’re feeling overwhelmed. List out what you need to do next to tackle and address whatever you’re facing. Chunk it down into manageable and understandable pieces.

34. Remind yourself you only have to get through the next five minutes. Then the next five. And so on.

35. Take five minutes to meditate.

36. Write out a list of 25 reasons you’ll be OK.

37. Write out a list of 25 examples of things you’ve overcome or accomplished.

38. Write out a list of 25 reasons you’re a good, lovable person.

39. Write out a list of 25 things that make your life beautiful.

40. Sniff some scents that bring you joy or remind you of happier times.

41. Ask for support from friends and family via text if voice-to-voice contact feels like too much. Ask them to check in with you via text daily or weekly, whatever you need.

42. Lay down on the ground. Let the Earth or floor hold you. You don’t have to hold it all on your own.

43. Clean up a corner of a room of your house. Sometimes tidying up can help calm our minds.

44. Ask yourself: What’s my next most immediate priority? Do that that. Then ask the question again.

45. Read some poetry. RumiHafiz, and Mary Oliver are all excellent.

46. Take a tech break. Delete or deactivate social media if it feels too triggering right now.

47. Or maybe get on tech. If you’ve been isolating, maybe interacting with friends and family online might feel good.

48. Go out in public and be around others. You don’t have to engage, but maybe sit in a coffee shop or on a bench at a museum and soak up the humanity around you.

49. Or if you’re feeling too saturated with contact, go home. Cancel plans and tend to the introverted parts of yourself.

50. Ask friends and family to remind you that things will be OK and that what you’re feeling is temporary.

51. Put up some Christmas lights in your bedroom. They often make things more magical.

52. Spend a little money and treat yourself to some self-care and comfort. Maybe take a taxi versus the bus. Buy your lunch instead of forcing yourself to pack it. Buy some flowers that delight you.

53. Make art. Scribble with crayons. Splash some watercolors. Paint a rock. Whatever. Just create something.

54. Go wander around outside in your neighborhood and take a look at all the lovely houses and the way people decorate their gardens. Delight in the diversity of design.

55. Go visit or volunteer at your local animal rescue. Pet some animals.

56. Look at photos of people you love. Set them as the wallpaper of your phone or laptop.

57. Create and listen to a playlist of songs that remind you of happier times.

58. Read some spiritual literature.

59. Scream, pound pillows, tear up paper, shake your body to move the energy out.

60. Eat your favorite, most comforting foods.

61. Watch old “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” videos online.

62. Turn off the lights, sit down, stare into space, and do absolutely nothing.

63. Pick one or two things that feel like progress and do them. Make your bed. Put away the dishes. Return an email.

64. Go to a church or spiritual community service. Sit among others and absorb any guidance or grace that feels good to you.

65. Allow yourself to fantasize about what you’re hoping or longing for. There are clues and energy in your reveries and daydreams that are worth paying attention to.

66. Watch autonomous sensory meridian response videos to help you calm down and fall asleep at night.

67. Listen to monks chantingsinging Tibetan bowls, or nature sounds to help soothe you.

68. Color in some coloring books.

69. Revisit an old hobby. Even if it feels a little forced, try your hand at things you used to enjoy and see what comes up for you.

70. Go to the ocean. Soak up the negative ions.

71. Go to the mountains. Absorb the strength and security of them.

72. Go to the forest. Drink in the shelter, life, and sacredness of the trees.

73. Put down the personal help books and pick up some good old-fashioned fiction.

74. Remember: Your only job right now is to put one foot in front of the other.

75. Allow and feel and express your feelings — all of them! — safely and appropriately. Seek out help if you need support in this.

76. Listen to sad songs or watch sad movies if you need a good cry. (“Steel Magnolias,” anyone?)

77. Dance around wildly to your favorite, most cheesy songs from your high school years.

78. Put your hands in dirt. If you have a garden, go garden. If you have some indoor plants, tend to them. If you don’t have plants or a garden, go outside. Go to a local nursery and touch and smell all the gorgeous plants.

79. If you want to stay in bed all day watching Netflix, do it. Indulge.

80. Watch or listen to some comedy shows or goofy podcasts.

81. Look up examples of people who have gone through and made it through what you’re currently facing. Seek out models of inspiration.

82. Get expert help with whatever you need. Whether that’s through therapy, psychiatry, a lawyer, clergy, or something else, let those trained to support you do it.

83. Educate yourself about what you’re going through. Learn about what you’re facing, what you can expect to feel, and how you can support yourself in this place.

84. Establish a routine and stick to it. Routines can bring so much comfort and grounding in times of life that feel chaotic or out of control.

85. Do some hardcore nesting and make your home or bedroom as cozy and beautiful and comforting as possible.

86. Get up early and watch a sunrise.

87. Go outside, set up a chair, and watch the sunset.

88. Make your own list of self-soothing activities that engage all five of your senses.

89. Develop a supportive morning ritual for yourself.

90. Develop a relaxing evening ritual for yourself.

91. Join a support group for people who are going through what you’re going through. Check out the listings at local hospitals, libraries, churches, and universities to see what’s out there.

92. Volunteer at a local shelter or hospital or nursing home. Practice being of service to others who may also be going through a tough time.

93. Accompany a friend or family member to something. Even if it’s just keeping them company while they run errands, sometimes this kind of contact can feel like good self-care.

94. Take your dog for a walk. Or borrow a friend’s dog and take them for a walk.


This kangaroo dog loves walks.

95. Challenge your negative thinking.

96. Practice grounding, relaxation techniques.

97. Do something spontaneous. Walk or drive a different way to work. Order something new off the menu. Listen to a playlist of new songs.

98. Work with your doctor, naturopath, or nutritionist to develop a physical exercise plan and food plan that will be supportive to whatever you’re facing right now.

99. Pray. Meditate. Write a letter to God, the universe, the Source, your higher self — whatever you believe in.

100. As much as you can, try and trust the process.

101. Finally, remember, what you’re going through right now is temporary. It may not feel like that from inside the tough time you’re in, but this too shall pass and you will feel different again someday. If you can’t have faith in that, let me hold the hope for you.

This list is really just a starting point meant to catalyze your own thinking about how you can best take care of yourself during life’s tough times and to spark your curiosity and interest in strengthening your self-care now and ongoing.

It’s not meant to be prescriptive nor do I mean to imply you need to do all or any of these things to take good care of yourself. You are the expert of your own experience, and I trust that you know what’s best for you.

Also, my hope is that in reading this, you’re hearing me say how normal and natural it is to struggle and to have these tough, hard times. It’s part of being human.

You’re not alone in this.

The suggestions and ideas mentioned herein— in no way are a substitute for care or advice from a licensed mental health care clinician, doctor, or other accredited professional. These are self-care coaching suggestions, not therapeutic advice. Moreover, if you feel suicidal or find yourself having suicidal ideations, call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

“Smiley” Depression

Staff Reports—

 

When many people think of depression, they often think of sadness — and not much else. This generalization can be harmful to people who experience depression, but may not “look” depressed. For some, depression may look like sadness or exhaustion. For others, depression might look like a smiling face, or a person who “has it all together” — something we think of as “smiling depression.”

It’s important to remember every person’s experience of depression needs to be taken seriously, no matter what it looks like on the outside.2 We wanted to know things only people with “smiling depression” understand, so we asked members of our mental health community to weigh in.

Here’s what they shared with us:

  1. “It’s easier to cheer people up but not myself. I can make them feel great when they’re going through the worst [times], but I cannot get myself happy, really happy. That happiness you see is just a way of not letting people [see] my problems.” — Sofia V.
  2. “I am so tired. So, so tired, all of the time. It doesn’t matter if I’m sitting and pouting or smiling and engaging. [It doesn’t matter if I’m] dancing, running, swimming, eating, brushing my teeth, by myself or in a room full of people or sleeping. I. Am. Exhausted.” — Rinna M.
“Other people don’t get it. What it’s like to feel so trapped and in darkness, because I appear ‘happy’ and strong — even though [it feels like] I’m slowly dying.”
— Nicole G.
  1. “[I] fake it because [I believe] no one wants to hear about [my] depression. [I] fake it because [I am] tired of hearing all the ‘expert’ advice insinuating that [I’m] just [not] trying hard enough.” — Lisa C.
  2. “[I] don’t always wear the mask for other people. Sometimes [I] wear it because [I] don’t want to believe [I] feel as miserable as [I do]. [For me], it isn’t always about making other people with [me feel] OK. Sometimes it’s wearing the mask so [I] don’t lose [my] job or so [I] can just get takeout without being asked what’s wrong.” — Melinda A.
  3. “I can still laugh and give a big belly laugh about things, but on the inside, I feel empty. It’s a weird feeling being happy as much as you can, but your mind won’t follow suit. [I] just feel empty and the happiness isn’t genuine. It’s fake but [I] can’t change that no matter how hard [I] try for it to be a real feeling. Depression drains everything out of me. It takes an enormous amount of strength to appear ‘normal,’ it exhausts me… [My] smile doesn’t reach [my] eyes.” — Rebecca R.
  4. “The problem lies in the fact that no one truly and honestly knows me. I feel like I’m alone every day — even when I’m surrounded by people.” — Jen W.
  5. “[I] constantly doubt whether [my] struggles are real. When [I] finally get the courage and strength to open up about [my] depression, [I] always hear, ‘But you don’t act like you have depression.’ It took me years to come to terms and believe my own struggles.” — Adrianna R.
  6. “Most days, I feel like I’m just barely surviving. Once I’m alone at the end of the day, all I have the energy for is crying. Crying because I’m just so exhausted with life and I’ll convince myself I can’t handle tomorrow and I need to call in sick. But when the next day actually comes, I’m too afraid to not show up. Eventually, after debating with myself for far longer than I should, I drag myself out of bed. The cycle [feels] never-ending. It’s like, if I choose one day to just stay in bed instead of getting up, it would be the most horrible thing in the world, so I eventually always get up, no matter how exhausted I am. It’s inevitable.” — Keira H.
  7. “I try to keep up appearances to protect my family because my depression upsets them. I’m not very outwardly emotional, so everything gets to me more than I show it. I can’t open up to them, because I just get told, ‘Change your thoughts,’ ‘You seem fine, why do you want to go to a therapist?’ It makes those times when I can’t control my emotions even worse. I feel alone, tired and lost.” — Jessica C.
  8. “Sometimes I really, like really want to show people how I’m really feeling, but I just physically cannot take the mask off. It’s like the walls just grow stronger the more I try to tear them down.” — Kira H.
  9. “[I thought] if I faked being happy enough, then maybe I could get a glimpse of what it’s like to be ‘normal.’ I always feel like such a burden on the people [who] love me. [I feel] I have no choice but to pretend.” — Bree N
  10. “The time I’m most encouraging to myself is when I’m telling myself, I can make them laugh so they never suspect anything! I’m funny, right?” — Shelby S
  11. “The physical pain as well as the emotional pain. It hurts to walk, get up, move, force [myself] to smile, try to look ‘normal,’ happy.” — Keara M.
  12. “[ I believe] we are the best actors in the world. Because if I have to explain depression one more time… it’s just easier to fake it until I get home.” — Lisa K.

 

If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.

If you need support right now, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text “START” to 741-741.

 

Unique Hurdles to Managing Stress in College

Managing Stress

College requires significantly more effort from students than high school.  Once you enter college, you will probably find that your fellow students are more motivated, your instructors are more demanding, the work is more difficult, and you are expected to be more independent. These higher academic standards and expectations are even more evident in graduate school. As a result of these new demands, it is common for college students to experience greater levels of stress related to academics.

Many students find that they need to develop new skills in order to balance academic demands with a healthy lifestyle.  Fortunately, the University of Michigan offers many resources to help students develop these skills.  Many students find that they can reduce their level of academic stress by improving skills such as time management, stress management, and relaxation.

The Pros and Cons of Stress

Stress is anything that alters your natural balance. When stress is present, your body and your mind must attend to it in order to return you to balance. Your body reacts to stress by releasing hormones that help you cope with the situation.  That in turn takes energy away from the other functions of your brain, like concentrating, or taking action.  There are two different sources of stress: external triggers, like getting a poor grade or breaking up with your girlfriend/boyfriend, and internal triggers, like placing high expectations on yourself.

La Di Da by Asher Roth:
“How are you dealing?”

Watch this music video which shows how six college students deal with stress.
From halfofus.com

Stress is a part of everyday life. There are many instances when stress can be helpful. A fire alarm is intended to cause the stress that alerts you to avoid danger. The stress created by a deadline to finish a paper can motivate you to finish the assignment on time. But when experienced in excess, stress has the opposite effect. It can harm our emotional and physical health, and limit our ability to function at home, in school, and within our relationships. But the good news is that, since we are responsible for bringing about much of our own stress, we can also do much to manage stress by learning and practicing specific stress-reduction strategies.

Click here to learn more about academic stress.  This link will take you to information and helpful tips including a study skills checklist.

Are you experiencing too much stress?

Here are a few common indicators:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Increased worrying
  • Trouble completing assignments on time
  • Not going to class
  • Short temper or increased agitation
  • Tension
  • Headaches
  • Tight muscles
  • Changes in eating habits (e.g., “stress eating”)
  • Changes in sleeping habits

People with mental health disorders are more likely to notice that their specific symptoms reemerge or grow worse during stressful times. In many cases, stress can act as the “spark” that ignites a mental health episode. But this does not mean that every time you are busy or face a difficult challenge you will have a mental health episode. Not everyone responds the same way to potentially stressful circumstances. For example, during final exams many students feel very overwhelmed and anxious, while others are able to keep their stress under control. If you are one of the many people who have difficulty managing stress during difficult times, look for some helpful tips below.

Ways of reducing and managing stress

  • A feeling of control and a healthy balance in your schedule is a necessary part of managing stress. Learning how to manage your responsibilities, accomplish your goals and still have time for rest and relaxation requires that you practice time management skills.
  • Try setting a specific goal for yourself that will improve your mood and help you reduce stress. Start by filling out a goal-setting worksheet.
  • Avoid procrastination. Putting off assignments or responsibilities until the last minute can create more mental and physical stress than staying on top of them.  Procrastination can affect many aspects of daily life, such as the quality of your work, the quality of your sleep, and your mood.
  • Exercise regularly. Physical activity can help you burn off the energy generated by stress.
  • Practice good sleep habits to ensure that you are well-rested. Sleep deprivation can cause many physical and mental problems and can increase stress.
  • Try mindfulness meditation.
  • Limit (or eliminate) the use of stimulants like caffeine, which can elevate the stress response in your body.
  • Pace yourself throughout the day, taking regular breaks from work or other structured activities. During breaks from class, studying, or work, spend time walking outdoors, listen to music or just sit quietly, to clear and calm your mind.
  • Start a journal. Many people find journaling to be helpful for managing stress, understanding
    emotions, and making decisions and changes in their lives.
  • Realize that we all have limits. Learn to work within your limits and set realistic expectations for yourself and others.
  • Plan leisure activities to break up your schedule.
  • Recognize the role your own thoughts can play in causing you distress. Challenge beliefs you may hold about yourself and your situation that may not be accurate. For example, do you continuously fall short of what you think you “should” accomplish? When our minds continuously feed us messages about what we “should” achieve, “ought” to be, or “mustn’t” do, we are setting ourselves up to fall short of goals that may be unrealistic, and to experience stress along the way. Learn techniques for replacing unrealistic thoughts with more realistic ones.
  • Find humor in your life. Laughter can be a great tension-reducer.
  • Seek the support of friends and family when you need to “vent” about situations that bring on stressful feelings. But make sure that you don’t focus exclusively on negative experiences; try to also think of at least three things that are going well for you, and share those experiences.
  • Try setting a specific goal for yourself that will improve your mood and help you reduce stress. Start by filling out a goal-setting worksheet then help yourself stay on track.

Call To Action: ADDY Beverages Inc. “Addy Energy Drink”

Our Executive Director has launched a campaign to shed light on an Ohio Energy Drink manufacture, Addy Beverage Inc.

UPDATE: April 21, 2017 WLWT Interview by Hearst ft. our Founder

IMG_2740OUR STANCE

As an organization on the forefront of mental health advocacy in the collegiate setting,  we find it deeply disturbing to find an Ohio Energy Drink Manufacture using one of the most widely abused prescription medications to illicit buying behavior amongst the public. The can resembles in precise color and design the most commonly prescribed ADDERALL XR pill—in an appeal to buyers interested in having energy sourced in the same sense as what is commonly abused to gain rapid energy. It is a blatant correlation to the perceived benefits one gets from taking Adderall when abused to gain energy, speed, and altered minds and behavior.

Screen Shot 2017-04-18 at 12.15.17 PM
Store Shelves Addy Beverage Display in Retail Gas Station
Screen Shot 2017-04-18 at 12.15.05 PM
Addy Beverage Home Page Scan

Goal

Campuses nationwide, have experienced considerable growth in misuse of prescription stimulants. Several national studies have found that approximately one-third of college students misuse, and a recent survey of students confirmed this.

Prescription stimulants (specifically Adderall) have seen rising popularity, as demonstrated by their presence in popular TV shows (such as Pretty Little Liars) and Youtube videos.

Consider This:

  • What does the film for example highlight about the effects of Adderall? What does it say about pressures?
  • They take Adderall, presumably to study for their exam, but what do they do instead? How do they feel in the morning?
  • What symptoms do they show after taking Adderall?

There are Blatant Risks of Misuse of Adderall or Other Stimulants Without a Prescription

  • For what purposes do students misuse Adderall?
  • Do you know what risks are involved when taking Adderall or other stimulants without a prescription?

What are stimulants prescribed for?

  • Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
    • 7%-11% of children and adolescents are diagnosed with the disorder & two-thirds of them are prescribed stimulants
  • Narcolepsy
  • Obesity

How do stimulants work?

  • increase dopamine levels in the brain
    • neurotransmitter associated with pleasure, movement, and attention
    • creates a therapeutic effect with an increase in one’s ability to focus
  • prescribed in low dosages to increase dopamine in a manner similar to the natural release in the brain

Increasing Availability of Stimulants

  • ADHD diagnosis grew 17% between 2010 and 2011 and continues to rise
  • 19-25 year olds increased medicine use by 2% from 2010-2011
  • 2.7 million youth are prescribed the drug each year
  • 5.3% of college students prescribed stimulants

Public Perception

  • Little Risk
    • 40% of young adults believe that it is safer to abuse prescription stimulants than illicit ones
    • 30% of young adults believe that prescription stimulants are not addictive
  • High Reward
    • “Smart pill” that boosts GPA and academic performance
    • 65.2% use to improve alertness and concentration

Health Risks of Stimulant Abuse

  • Paranoia
  • Increased body temperature
  • Abnormal heartbeat
  • Hostility
  • Psychosis
  • Anxiety
  • …and even a drop in academic performance

Addiction and Withdrawal

  • High risk of addiction
    • Quick rise in dopamine can create sense of euphoria
    • Body becomes reliant on medication to produce dopamine
  • Withdrawal symptoms
    • fatigue, depression, disrupted sleep

Stimulants and Alcohol Use

  • Masks the depressant action of alcohol
    • Increases risk of alcohol overdose
  • May compound the stimulant health risks
    • higher risk of:
      • paranoia
      • hostility
      • anxiety

Prescription Stimulant Abuse at Vanderbilt

Anonymous Survey conducted on March 13-14, 2013

-242 students

-59% female

-88% greek life

-equal representation of all four classes

Survey Data: Prevalence on Campus

– 36% of students admitted to using prescription stimulants without a prescription

– 31% admitted to using prescription stimulants to help them focus on studying

-19% used prescription stimulants to pull an “all nighter”

-17% used prescription stimulants for recreational (for fun) use

-3% used prescription stimulants to lose weight or for athletic purposes

Survey Data: Supply

-How easy is it to obtain Adderall, Ritalin, Vyvanse, etc. from students on campus?

-0%: very difficult

-35.56%: somewhat easy

-35.15%: very easy

-8.37%: somewhat difficult

-20.92%: I’m not sure

Legal Consequences: Vanderbilt

The following are excerpts from the Vanderbilt Student Handbook at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/student_handbook/alcoholic-beverage-and-controlled-substances-policies/

Distribution or facilitation of distribution of illegal drugs (including unlawful distribution of prescription medication) may result in suspension or expulsion for a first offense; unlawful distribution includes incidents in which no money is exchanged. In addition, the possession of controlled substances or alcohol in such quantities as to create a presumption of possession with the intent to distribute on or off campus is a serious violation that may result in immediate suspension or expulsion. Evidence that a student has distributed drugs is grounds for interim suspension from the University and/or expulsion from University housing pending the findings of accountability proceedings. Students found to have distributed drugs to others may also be held responsible for personal injuries or property damages resulting from misconduct committed by the students under the influence of the distributed substances.

The presumptive sanction for a third violation of alcohol or controlled substances policies is suspension.

Violations involving behavior that injures persons, that damages property, or that injures or damages the community at-large, will increase the presumptive strength of the sanction given.

In addition, sanctions will be imposed for misconduct that results from the use of alcoholic beverages or other drugs. Students will also be held responsible for any damages that result from their misconduct. These sanctions will be imposed consistent with standards and procedures found in Chapter 3, “Student Accountability.”

Prescription Drugs:

Many medications and prescribed drugs have the potential for abuse. Those listed below are some of the most abused, addictive and dangerous.

  • Adderall, Concerta, Ritalin, etc. are stimulants and controlled by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). These drugs are often prescribed for students who have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or ADHD. They are, however, used by some individuals who have do not have ADHD to increase alertness or recreationally for a “high.” Studies do not show improved academic performance when these stimulants are taken by students without ADHD. The risk from misuse of these drugs ranges from lack of sleep and weight loss to the more severe risk of psychosis with severely disorganized thinking. Individuals who develop psychosis have very poor insight and judgment and so continue to use the drugs in excess. For individuals abusing these stimulants, abrupt withdrawal may lead to significant mood changes including severe depression with a risk of self harm.
  • Codeine, Hydrocodone (Lortab and Vicodin), and Oxycodone (Percocet and OxyContin) are medications that are prescribed for severe pain. All these drugs can be addictive and may be abused for feeling anxious, sedation, falling asleep or to get a “buzz” or “high.” Addiction to pain medications is common and withdrawal can be very difficult to manage.
  • Xanax, Valium, and other benzodiazepine drugs are prescribed for acute anxiety and panic attacks. Use of all benzodiazepine compounds can lead to psychological and physiological dependence.  Symptoms associated with withdrawal from these drugs can be severe and include seizures. Barbiturates are also sedative medications that can be addictive. Barbiturates are no longer commonly prescribed, but are potentially addictive. As with all sedatives, withdrawal symptoms can be dangerous and severe. Combination of these drugs with other central nervous system depressants can be dangerous.

Warning Signs of Possible Substance Abuse

  • Withdrawal from social situations
  • Increased boredom or drowsiness
  • Change in personal appearance (increasingly unkempt or sloppy)
  • Change in friends
  • Easily discouraged; defeatist attitude
  • Low frustration tolerance (outbursts)
  • Violent behavior and vandalism
  • Terse replies to questions or conversation
  • Sad or forlorn expression
  • Lying
  • Poor classroom attendance
  • Dropping grades or poor work
  • Apathy or loss of interest
  • Change in sleep pattern ranging from excessive sleep to inability to sleep
  • Frequent excuses for absences from planned activities

When such signs appear in friends,

DO

  • Express your concern and caring
  • Be ready to listen
  • Communicate your desire to help
  • Make concrete suggestions as to where the student can find help or how he or she might cope with a given problem
  • Try to get the student to seek professional help
  • Ask for assistance from campus resources
  • Be persistent
  • Understand the definition of friendship to include making difficult decisions that may anger your friends

DON’T

  • Take the situation lightly or as a joke
  • Be offended if the student tries to “put you off”
  • Take “I don’t have a problem” as an answer
  • Try to handle the student alone-ask for assistance
  • Lecture about right and wrong
  • Promote guilt feelings about grades or anything else
  • Gossip: speak of it only to those who can help
  • Excuse behavior because “everybody does it”

References

CALL TO ACTION: Univ. North Florida

Update: Student Union Director confirms post was innocently posted on social media and has been removed, there was never an on campus presence as originally reported.


On April 17th our Exec. Director sent a call to action regarding an insensitive Call to Action for University of North Florida AdminsScreen Shot 2017-04-18 at 11.49.44 AM

Ball State University

Department of Communication Studies

 

 

 

STIGMA RESEARCH PAPER

 

By Jake Griffin

 

 

 
 

 

April 19, 2017

 

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of:

 

Human Relationship Development

CSPY 230, SECT 800

 

Instructor:

Chad Sims

 

 

S T I G M A

 

S-T-I-G-M-A—Stigma. How can one six letter word cause so many people suffering from mental illness so much pain, shame, isolation, secrecy and discrimination? Stigma refers to the negative or misperceived feelings one exhibits towards another of a certain trait or characteristic, such as in this instance, being plagued with mental health issues ranging from Major Depressive Disorder to post traumatic stress disorder(PTSD). How can having to deal with a mental illness be just as bad as having to face the major forms of adversity that come with sharing the way you feel with others? While many share a commitment to helping improve equality pertaining to those struggling with mental health, there are obstacles and barriers in place by society and in the general publics’ perceptions that make equality a distant reality. This stigma is often a major determent towards those in need opting to receive quality care, leading to impediments of their overall wellbeing which disables them from living the most positive and fulfilling lives possible. 

The movies and media sometime describe people with mental illnesss as, “homicidal maniacs” leading to a public perception of mental illness that leads many suffering not to pursue treatment out of fear of be labeled. This in turn leads to several major types of stigma known as public, label avoidance, structural stigma and self-stigma. These varying forms have led to public perceptions. According to Rogers & Pilgrim (2009), the public has mixed perceptions regarding people with mental illness. They believe that people with mental disorder are more likely to act violently, commit crimes, endanger others, and behave inappropriately or unintelligibly. Some people have a “fear of contamination by the illness and fear of unpredictable danger” initiated by mentally ill people (Rogers & Pilgrim, 2009, p. 24-26). As result, the general public tends to stereotype and discriminate people with mental illness. The stigmatized people are often excluded from their social or cultural groups which can further lead to further isolation (Rogers & Pilgrim, 2009). Additionally, the prejudice attitude and the label that people with mental illness perceive from the public lower their self-efficacy or self-esteem, and threatens their sense of self-identity. They are most likely to feel depersonalized, rejected, and disempowered (Rogers & Pilgrim, 2009). The feeling of despair, helplessness, and worthlessness are also the result. Leading not only to negative impacts for the stigmatized person struggling from a mental illness but in addition these negative connotations, also have a disadvantage in employment, particularly in the already competitive job market as well. So what exactly is stigma? Stigma shows up in different forms. The President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health defines stigma as “a cluster of negative attitudes and beliefs that motivate the general public to fear, reject, avoid, and discriminate against people with mental illnesses.” So, stigma begins in our minds. It happens when we believe myths and popular media portrayals of mental illness, such as, “All people with mental illness are violent,” and we start to put those with mental illness in a box. We assign labels and see them as different from us. And the moment society starts to see someone or something as “different”, it sets the stage for wrongful treatment to follow. Think of racism or sexism. Stigma is not much different, although we don’t consider it a blatant social taboo in that sense, as it sometimes should be. Like the “-ism” forms of prejudice, stigma manifests itself outwardly—by way of discrimination in both subtle and overt forms. 

Most importantly to consider in regard to stigma is the harm this causes—both for the person with mental illness and for society at large.

First, stigma impacts the individual with mental illness. The CDC reports that only 20% of adults with a mental disorder saw a mental health provider in the past year, and the shame and embarrassment associated with getting help is a major barrier. We have created a society where people don’t want others to find out about their “issues”, and for this reason alone, many avoid seeking treatment. Instead, they may turn to dangerous coping methods such as binging or self-coping with explicit drugs or drinking, which raises their risk for chronic disease, addiction and premature death. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, those living with serious mental illness die an average of 25 years earlier than the general public—largely in treatable conditions. On a broader level, stigma harms society. Discrimination against people with mental illness leads to unequal access to housing, health care, employment, education, and community support, and this leads to unemployment, homelessness, and poverty. In addition, the perception that mass media portrays about mentally ill people as “being naively cheerful, childlike, and quirky” (Rogers & Pilgrim, 2009, p. 36) lead to social misinterpretation. Martinez (2014) stated that fear of social discrimination becomes a major barrier that does not motivate people who are experiencing mental distress to seek for psychiatric help. Fear of losing job status, fear of criticism, and fear of losing a family also prevent them from obtaining psychiatric intervention (Martinez, 2014). Evidently, people with mental illness perceived stigma in all angles which further lead to mental health deterioration.

       How do the attitudes of community members contribute to stigmatization in people with mental illness? Schulz (2007) states that people with mental illness not only experience this stigma or social discrimination from families, relatives, colleagues, and employers, but they also experience stigmatization from being exposed to someone with a mental illness firsthand. For example, Rogers & Pilgrim (2009) point out that “mental health care workers tend to be paternalistic towards psychotic patients by distrusting and rejecting of those with a diagnosis of personality disorder” (p. 38). Patients diagnosed with mental illness are more likely to receive a lesser quality of psychiatric care by mental health care providers. A study reveals that patients felt stigmatized when mental health professionals do not have interest in their patients’ concerns, do not explain the side-effects of antipsychotic medication such as extrapyramidal symptoms, weight gain; and in fact, they provide generalized treatment to all patients rather than patient-centred treatment (Schulz, 2007). Patients further report that mental health professionals are often provided “a negative prognosis such as ‘You’ve got schizophrenia, you will be ill for the rest of your life’ or ‘your illness means that you will end up committing suicide” (Schulz, 2007, p. 145). These comments not only provide a clear explanation to patients about the treatment, but these comments also further stigmatize patients with mental illness. It is obvious that patients with mental illness perceived stigma before, during, and after seeking for psychiatric treatment.

How can we all help reduce stigmatization in people with mental illness? There are many programs that the stakeholders and advocates have employed on a nationwide and global level to to fight and curve the stigma in mental health. Active Minds, is a national student mental health awareness and advocacy group based in Washington, DC formed in 2003. Their mission is to increase students’ awareness of mental health issues, provide information and resources regarding mental health and mental illness, and to encourage to seek help as soon as it is needed. By promoting awareness and education, Active Minds aims to reduce stigma that surrounds mental illness and create an open environment for discussion of mental health issues. The goals of these programs are aimed to change the publics attitude toward the people with mental illness and respect them as equal citizens. According to Horsfall (2010), the expected outcomes are to eliminate discrimination and prejudice, increase public awareness, provide knowledge regarding mental health, reduce barriers to psychiatric treatment, and improve stigma management. In order to address the issue of discrimination in employment, the CDC alongside stakeholders such as Mental Health America provide educational programs and outreach teams in an effort to curtail the stigmatizing thoughts and beliefs in society about mental illness. Studies suggest that advocates must also educate themselves to avoid stigmatization in mental health field. By providing an in-service training session or QPR(Suicidal ideation version of CPR) regarding stigma to mental health care professionals, undergraduates, postgraduates and by focusing on encouraging hope, promoting recovery process, and providing a human centered approach, society gains perspective on stigmatization and their attitudes are better equipped to combat the ideologies that may contribute to stigmatization. In addition, Corrigan in 2001 found that the emotion of compassion provided by mental health care providers “are typically conceived of as directed outside the self, can redirect toward the self to promote care-taking actions such as treatment seeking.” Simply providing insight and resources for those who are experiencing mental illness use to learn more about the illness and treatment, attend a self-help group support, and meet and discuss about mental illness with community advocates are the strategies that help increase treatment seeking behaviors/ In addition, advocates should respect, listen, acknowledge consumers concerns, provide emotional support, and work with their strengths in order to reduce stigma. There are a plethora of ways for advocates and community members to help sufferers live more positive and fulfilling lives.

       In relation, people who are living with mental illness experience stigma from all aspects of life even from consumers or those with illnesses themselves who understand most about the nature of mental illness. Fortunately, there are many programs and campaigns that are designed to combat stigma in mental health nationally and internationally. It is evident that reducing stigma in mental health requires everyone’s effort, especially advocates who frequently interact with people in all walks of life. Mental illness can be present in anyone; regardless of socioeconomics status, age, or race—so it is not shameful to seek for help. In fact, it is beneficial to seek for treatment because one’s mental health can be well-nurtured and cared for. Together, these forms of “stigma” further form barriers to treatment for those with need. In order too effectively begin to heal the symptoms of mental illness, we must challenge the notion that seeking aid for behavioral health problems is not a sign of weakness or flawed character. We must raise public awareness of the realities of the behavioral health disorders afflicting those at risk. As Americans and as communities, we must take steps to provide adequate and continuous care for in all aspects of cognitive and social development. Community beliefs surrounding mental health, and especially suicide, is eradicated, out of touch and desensitized. Schools are discouraged from discussing suicide out of fear of memorializing suicides—out of fear of “suicide contagion.” However, chain suicides are rare and only account for 1 to 5 percent of suicides annually. In addition, 90 percent of people who commit suicide have a predetermined mental disorder, so there is no way to “catch suicide.” This means censoring suicide memorials and desensitizing mental illness in schools or in other mediums such as Netflix benefits no one. This misinformation rooted in miseducation causes negative effects into adulthood. Just take a look at how politicians speak about mental illness:“We should work to reduce tragic acts of violence by addressing violence at its source, including untreated mental illness,” Marco Rubio said to a crowd of reporters shortly after the Sandy Hook shooting. Rubio has been notorious for using mental illness as a scapegoat for gun violence. When we only talk about mental health when something goes wrong, society is inevitably are going to associate these disorders with tragedy.

 

Eradicating the stigmas associated with mental health needs to be addressed head on. The fact is that we need to work to address and explain these issues preemptively. Tip toeing around so called “sensitive subjects” makes them taboo, when we should be working to normalize these very prevalent and detrimental issues impacting society.

 

WORK CITED

Benner, G. J., Beaudoin, K. M., Chen, P., Davis, C., & Ralston, N. C. (2010). The impact of intensive positive behavioral supports on the behavioral functioning of students with emotional disturbance: How much does fidelity matter? Journal of Behavior Assessment and Intervention in Children, 1(1), 85-100. doi:10.1037/h0100361

Brener, N. D., Martindale, J., & Weist, M. D. (2001). Mental Health and Social Services: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000. Journal of School Health, 71(7), 305-312. doi:10.1111/j.1746-1561.2001.tb03507.x

Cappella, E., Frazier, S. L., Atkins, M. S., Schoenwald, S. K., & Glisson, C. (2008). Enhancing Schools’ Capacity to Support Children in Poverty: An Ecological Model of School-Based Mental Health Services. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 35(5), 395-409. doi:10.1007/s10488-008-0182-y

Chappell, N. L., & Penning, M. (2009). Understanding health, health care, and health policy in Canada: sociological perspectives. Don Mills, Ont.: Oxford University Press.

CDC. (n.d.). Attitudes Toward Mental Illness – 35 States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, 2007. PsycEXTRA Dataset. doi:10.1037/e552452010-003

Corrigan, P.W., & Lundin, R.K. (2001). Don’t call me nuts! Coping with the stigma of mental

illness. (pp. 456). Tinley Park, IL: Recovery Press.    
Corrigan, P.W. (Ed.) (2005). On the stigma of mental illness: Implications for research and social change. (pp. 343). Washington DC: American Psychological Association Press. 
Corrigan, P.W., Roe, D., & Tsang, H., W. (2011). Challenging the Stigma of Mental Illness: Lessons for Therapists and Advocates. (pp.213). West-Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.       
Eckert, T. L., Miller, D. N., Riley-Tillman, T. C., & Dupaul, G. J. (2006). Adolescent suicide prevention: Gender differences in students’ perceptions of the acceptability and intrusiveness of school-based screening programs. Journal of School Psychology, 44(4), 271-285. doi:10.1016/j.jsp.2006.05.001

Gallagher, R. P., (2010). National Survey of Counseling Center Directors (Rep.). Alexandria, VA: The International Association of Counseling Services.

Gallagher, R. P., (2015). National Survey of Counseling Center Directors (Rep.). Alexandria, VA: The International Association of Counseling Services.

Haas, A. P., Koestner, B., Rosenberg, J., Moore, D., Garlow, S. J., Sedway, J., Nicholas, L., Hendin, H., Mann, J., and Nemeroff, C. B., “An Interactive Web-Based Method of Outreach to College Students at Risk for Suicide,” Journal of American College Health, Vol. 57, No. 1, 2008, pp. 15–22. 
Horsfall, J., Cleary, M., & Hunt, G. E. (2010). Stigma in Mental Health: Clients and Professionals. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31(7), 450-455. 
Kann, L., Telljohann, S. K., & Wooley, S. F. (2007). Health Education: Results From the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006. Journal of School Health,77(8), 408-434. doi:10.1111/j.1746-1561.2007.00228.x

Kataoka, S., Stein, B. D., Nadeem, E., & Wong, M. (2007). Who Gets Care? Mental Health Service Use Following a School-Based Suicide Prevention Program. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry,46(10), 1341-1348. doi:10.1097/chi.0b013e31813761fd

Nabors, L. A., & Reynolds, M. W. (2000). Program Evaluation Activities: Outcomes Related to Treatment for Adolescents Receiving School-Based Mental Health Services. Children’s Services, 3(3), 175-189. doi:10.1207/s15326918cs0303_4

Otto F. Wahl, Ph.D.; Mental Health Consumers’ Experience of Stigma. Schizophrenia Bulletin 1999; 25 (3): 467-478. doi: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.schbul.a033394
Perry, C. L., Klepp, K., Halper, A., Hawkins, K. G., & Murray, D. M. (1986). A Process Evaluation Study of Peer Leaders in Health Education. Journal of School Health, 56(2), 62-67. doi:10.1111/j.1746-1561.1986.tb01176.x

School-Based Health Care: Practice Interventions, Outcomes, and Impacts From the Field. (2012). School-Based Health Care: Advancing Educational Success and Public Health. doi:10.2105/9780875530062pt01

Schulz, R., & Sherwood, P. R. (2008). Physical and Mental Health Effects of Family Caregiving. The American Journal of Nursing, 108(9 Suppl), 23–27. http://doi.org/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000336406.45248.4c

State Specific Suicide Hotlines

Suicide Hotlines in the United States

Please click on your state below:

Alabama Suicide Hotlines

Alaska Suicide Hotlines

Arizona Suicide Hotlines

Arkansas Suicide Hotlines

California Suicide Hotlines

Colorado Suicide Hotlines

Connecticut Suicide Hotlines

Delaware Suicide Hotlines

Florida Suicide Hotlines

Georgia Suicide Hotlines

Hawaii Suicide Hotlines

Idaho Suicide Hotlines

Illinois Suicide Hotlines

Indiana Suicide Hotlines

Iowa Suicide Hotlines

Kansas Suicide Hotlines

Kentucky Suicide Hotlines

Louisiana Suicide Hotlines

Maine Suicide Hotlines

Maryland Suicide Hotlines

Massachusetts Suicide Hotlines

Michigan Suicide Hotlines

Minnesota Suicide Hotlines

Mississippi Suicide Hotlines

Missouri Suicide Hotlines

Montana Suicide Hotlines

Nebraska Suicide Hotlines

Nevada Suicide Hotlines

New Hampshire Suicide Hotlines

New Jersey Suicide Hotlines

New Mexico Suicide Hotlines

New York Suicide Hotlines

North Carolina Suicide Hotlines

North Dakota Suicide Hotlines

Ohio Suicide Hotlines

Oklahoma Suicide Hotlines

Oregon Suicide Hotlines

Pennsylvania Suicide Hotlines

Rhode Island Suicide Hotlines

South Carolina Suicide Hotlines

South Dakota Suicide Hotlines

Tennessee Suicide Hotlines

Texas Suicide Hotlines

Utah Suicide Hotlines

Vermont Suicide Hotlines

Virginia Suicide Hotlines

Washington Suicide Hotlines

Washington D.C. Suicide Hotlines

West Virginia Suicide Hotlines

Wisconsin Suicide Hotlines

Wyoming Suicide Hotlines

young girl on reception at the psychologist

Depression and Suicide

Untreated depression is the number one cause for suicide.

You are not depressed when you feel sad for a day or two; you are depressed when you experience a prolonged period of sadness that interferes with your ability to function. Depression occurs because of an imbalance of chemicals in the brain. It is an illness. And it is highly treatable.

Unfortunately, many people do not receive treatment for depression, and thus are at risk for suicide.

If you or have some of these symptoms below, please seek help immediately:

  • Feeling sad for two or more weeks
  • Feeling lethargic — feeling like you have no energy
  • Unable to concentrate
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Feeling worthless
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Feeling helpless
  • Feeling negative or pessimisstic
  • Losing interest in activities that you previously enjoyed
  • Crying frequently
  • Withdrawing from others
  • Neglecting personal appearance
  • Feeling angry
  • Feeling guilty
  • Unable to think clearly
  • Unable to make decisions

Basically, if “the blues” do not go away after two weeks, you probably have depression. And you need to get treatment. So please make an appointment with a medical doctor and a therapist so you may be properly evaluated. Many people do not think of going to a medical doctor when they are depressed, but it is an important step because there could be a physical problem beside the chemical imbalance that is causing the depression. And please get into therapy. If the therapist believes that you need medication he or she can refer you to someone.

Get help now.

Get treatment now.

Many people who have depression do not get help. So please, do the right thing and make those appointments.

Again, you may need to take medication. So, please leave that option open. People take medication all of the time for a variety of ailments, why should taking medication for depression be any different?

And please understand that when you are depressed that you affect the people around you. So get help for your loved ones as well as yourself. If you need to take medication, then you should do so. You can ask the doctor and therapist all of the questions that you can think of. And you can do your own research. You can seek a second and even a third opinion. But the bottom line is that you need to do what is necessary to get better.

You might believe that you could never become suicidal, but protracted, untreated depression will make almost anyone suicidal, including you. So take action now. If you are depressed, make those appointments immediately.

If finances are holding you back, then look for low-priced clinics in your community. Call 1-800-SUICIDE for referrals.

If you are not depressed but know someone who is, please make sure that he or she receives help. Remember that untreated depression is the number one cause for suicide, so immediate action is required.

Take action–

Force yourself to take action.

People care about you.

So please take action now.

And please read the following articles for additional information about depression.

People With Depression Cannot “Snap Out Of It”

“It’s Not That Bad” is the Wrong Thing to Say to Someone Who is Depressed or Suicidal

I Think I Have Depression What Should I do?

Depression Information

Depression and Exercise

Depression and Your Diet

Morbid Obesity, Depression, and Suicide

Depression and Vitamins

Depression Distorts Your Thinking

Depression and Dietary Supplements

Brain Images Show Different Therapies for Depression Affect Different Areas of the Brain

Treating Depression with SSRIs

Why do Antidepressants Cause Side Effects in Some People and Not in Others?

Patients on Antidepressants Need to be Monitored Very Closely During Their First Month of Treatment

What You Need to Know if Your Child or Teen May Need Antidepressants

Are Antidepressants Safe for Children? Can They Cause Suicide?

Antidepressants Help Protect Hippocampus, an Important Brain Structure

Many Pregnant Women Suffer From Depression; Few Get Treatment; A Suicide Risk

Seniors Need to Stay Active to Fight Depression

Australian Doctors Help Reduce Elderly Suicide Rate By Recognizing and Treating Depression

Vascular Depression in the Elderly; A Suicide Risk

Study Shows Brain Difference in Those With Treatment-Resistant Depression

MRI Scans May Temporarily Relieve Depression; May be Used on People Who are Suicidal

When Will My Depression End?

If you are suicidal TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION

Call 1-800-273-8255
Available 24 hours everyday
Self-Help QUOTES

Self-Help Quotes

Insightful Quotes on Self-Help

#1 and most importantly; “Don’t feel guilty for doing what is best for you.”

Self-improvement quote – What ever you decide to do, make sure it makes you happy.
Quote about self-help – What ever you decide to do, make sure it makes you happy.

Self-help quote – If you stumble, make it part of the dance.
Self-improvement quote – The moment when you want to quit, is the moment when you need to keep pushing.
Quote about self-help – What we see depends mainly on what we look for.
Self-help quote – There is a season for everything under the sun-even when we can’t see the sun.
Self-improvement quote – A happy soul is the best shield for a cruel world.
Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground
Self-help quote – It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.
Self-improvement quote – Remember to be proud of yourself. No victory is too small to celebrate.
Quote about self-help: “At the end of the day, you can either focus on what’s tearing you apart or what’s holding you together.
Self-help quote – Difficult roads often lead to be beautiful destinations.”
Self-improvement quote – Don’t stumble over something behind you.
Quote about self-help – The greatest power you can give someone is to say, ‘I believe in you’.
Self-help quote – Sometimes the bad things that happen in our lives put us directly on the path to the best things that will ever happen to us.
Quote about self-help – It’s okay to be afraid of failing, you just can’t let it stop you from trying.
Self-improvement quote – Life is a balance of holding on and letting go.
Self-help quote – Believe in your dreams. They were given to you for a reason.
Quote about self-help – Don’t wait for the perfect moment. Take the moment and make it perfect.
Self-improvement quote – We’d achieve more if we chased our dreams instead of our competition.
Self-help quote – Until you cross the bridge of your insecurities, you can’t begin to explore your possibilities.
Quote about self-help – Sometimes we need someone to simply be there. Not to fix anything, or to do anything in particular, but just to let us feel that we are cared for and supported.
Self-improvement quote – Big things often have small beginnings.
Self-help quote – If you are not willing to risk the usual you will have to settle for the ordinary.
Quote about self-help – The future depends on what you do today.
Self-improvement quote – You can’t change the ocean or the weather, no matter how hard you try, so it’s best to learn how to sail in all conditions.
Self-help quote – Closed doors, rejections. They do not decide your fate, they simply redirect your course, you must keep moving because life’s detours can also be meaningful.
Quote about self-help – It might be stormy right now, but it can’t rain forever.
Self-improvement quote – Close your eyes and imagine the best version of you possible. That’s who you really are, let go of any part of you that doesn’t believe it.
Self-help quote – Nothing is permanent in this world. Not even our troubles.
Quote about self-help – We cannot achieve more in life than what we believe in our heart of hearts we deserve to have.
Self-improvement quote – Letting toxic people go in not an act of cruelty. It’s an act of self-care.
Self-help quote – A tiny step of courage is always a good place to start.
Quote about self-help – Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.
Self-improvement quote – Be thankful for what you are now and keep fighting for what you want to be tomorrow.
Self-help quote – You cannot change the people around you, but you can change the people you chooose to be around.
Quote about self-help – What you tell yourself everyday will either lift you up on tears you down.
Self-improvement quote – The only way you are going to experience the beauty of life is to stop obsessing about what’s wrong with it.
Self-help quote – Remember even your worst days only have 24 hours.

Quotes on Depression

Depression quotes and sayings about depression can provide insight into what it’s like living with depression as well as inspiration and a feeling of “someone gets it.” These quotes on depression and depression sayings deal with different aspects of the illness such as grief, sadness, loneliness and other related issues. Feel free to share them on your website, blog or social page for your own enjoyment or to help others.

Quote on depression: “I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare.”

Depression quote: “Depression is melancholy minus its charms.”

Quote on depression: “I thought by masking the depression with silence, the feelings might disappear.”

Depression quote: “That is all I want in life: for this pain to seem purposeful.”

Quote on depression: “I want to sleep until I feel better.”

Depression quote: “Anyone who has actually been that sad can tell you that there’s nothing beautiful or literary or mysterious about depression.”

Quote on depression: “I am sad all the time and the sadness is so heavy that I can’t get away from it.”

Depression quote: “I feel so disconnected from the world, and I feel like no one even notices me or cares about me anymore.”

Quote on depression: “They ask. “How are you doing?” But what they mean is “Are you over it yet?” My lips say, “Fine, thanks”, but my eyes tell a different story, my heart sings a different tune, and my soul just weeps.”

Depression quote: “It’s so difficult to describe depression to someone who’s never been there, because it’s not sadness.”

Quote on depression: “Somehow, like so many people who get depressed, we felt our depressions were more complicated and existentially based than they actually were.”

Depression quote: “It’s so difficult to describe depression to someone who’s never been there, because it’s not sadness.”

Quote on depression: “Anger, resentment and jealousy doen’t change the heart of others-it only changes yours.”

Quote on depression: “You are allowed to feel messed up and inside out. It doesn’t mean you’re defective – it just means you’re human.”

Depression quote: “There are wounds that never show on the body that are deeper and more hurtful than anything that bleeds.”

Quote on depression: “Every man has his secret sorrows which the world knows not; and often times we call a man cold when he is only sad.”

Depression quote: “Depression isn’t just being a bit sad. It’s feeling nothing. It’s not wanting to be alive anymore.”

Quote on depression: “And I knew it was bad when I woke up in the mornings and the only thing I looked forward to was going back to bed.”

Depression quote: “The only thing more exhausting than being depressed is pretending that you’re not.”

Quote on depression: “It’s not the feeling of completeness I need, but the feeling of not being empty.”

Depression quote: “Depression has nothing to do with having a bad day or being sad.”

Quote on depression: “She was drowning, but nobody saw her struggle”

Depression quote: “My silence is just another word for my pain.”

Quote on depression: “Sometimes I wonder if I will ever be happy with myself. I worry that if I can’t be happy with myself, then nobody will ever be happy with me”

Depression quote: “Sometimes I get so sad. So sad that I completely shut down. I stare blankly at the wall and it doesn’t matter what you say to me. Because in that moment. I don’t exist.”

Quote on depression: “I miss the person I used to be”

Depression quote: “When a depressed person shrinks away from your touch it does not mean she is rejecting you. Rather she is protecting you from the foul, destructive evil which she believes is the essence of her being and which she believes can injure you.”

Quote on depression: “My life is just one constant battle between wanting to be alone, but not wanting to be lonely.”

Depression quote: “That feeling when you’re not necessarily sad, but you just feel really empty.”

Quote on depression: “I’m exhausted from trying to be stronger than I feel.”

Depression quote: “It’s not always the tears that measure the pain. Sometimes it’s the smile we fake.”

Quote on depression: “I want to be happy but something inside me screams that I do not deserve it.”

Depression quote: “I can’t describe what I’m feeling. I’m not happy, and I know that. But I’m also not exactly sad either. I’m just caught right in between all these emotions and I feel so empty.”

Quote on depression: “I want to be happy but something inside me screams that I do not deserve it.”

Depression quote: “The worst kind of pain is when you’re smiling just to stop the tears for falling.”

Quote on depression: “Depression is living in a body that fights to survive, with a mind that tries to die.”

Depression quote: “It’s a bit like walking down a long, dark corridor, never knowing when the light will go on.”

Quote on depression: “Depression is feeling like you’re lost something but having no clue when or where you last had it. Then one day you realize what you lost is yourself.”

Depression quote: “Sometimes just the thought of facing the day, feels like broken glass in my soul.”

Quote on depression: “Saying “I’m tired” when you’re actually sad.”

Depression quote: “Depression is the overwhelming sense of numbness and the desire for anything that can help you make it from one day to the next.”

Quote on depression: “People think depression is sadness, crying or dressing in black. But people are wrong. Depression is the constant feeling of being numb. You wake up in the morning just to go back to bed again.”

Depression quote: “I’m the type of girl who smiles to make everyone’s day. Even though I’m dying on the inside.”

Quote on depression: “I am not living. I am surviving.”

Depression quote: “I hate this feeling. Like I’m here, but I’m not. Like someone cares. But they don’t. Like I belong somewhere else, anywhere but here.”

Quote on depression: “Sometimes you just need someone to tell you you’re not as terrible as yo u think you are.”

Depression quote: “I feel lost inside of myself.”

Quote on depression: “You sometimes think you want to disappear, but all you really want is to be found.”

Depression quote: “I wish I could go back to a time when I could smile and it didn’t take everything in me to do it.”

Quote on depression: “Why does everything always feel worse at night.”

Depression quote: “I define depression as a comparison of your current reality to a fantasy about how you wish your life would be.”

Quote on depression: “Depression makes you isolated. It’s very hard to think of other people when you’re wrapped in a prickly blanket of sadness and all you can think about is your own pain.”

Depression quote: “I’m not sure if I’m depressed. I mean, I’m not sad, but I’m not exactly happy either. I can laugh and joke and smile during the day, but sometimes when I’m alone at night I forget how to feel.”

Quote on depression: “The worst kind of sad is not being able to explain why.”

Depression quote: “Crying is how your heart speaks, when your lips can’t explain the pain you feel.”

Quote on depression: “You hate when people see you cry because you want to be that strong girl. At the same time, though, you hate how nobody notices how torn apart and broken you are.”

Depression quote: “She says she’s fine but she’s going insane. She says she feels good but she’s in a lot of pain. She says it’s nothing but it’s really a lot. she says she’s okay. but really she’s not.”

Quote on depression: “It’s hard to answer the question “What’s wrong?” when nothing’s right.”

Depression quote: “That feeling when you’re not necessarily sad, but you just feel really empty.”

Quote on depression: “And then suddenly I became sad for no reason at all.”

Depression quote: “That’s the thing about depression: A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it’s impossible to ever see the end. The fog is like a cage without a key.”

Quote on depression: “When you have depression simply existing is a full time job.”

Depression quote: “Depression is a prison where you are both the suffering prisoner and the cruel jailer.”

Quote on depression: “When you are happy, you enjoy the music. but when you are sad, you understand the lyrics.”

Depression quote: “The most terrible poverty is loneliness, and the feeling of being unloved.”

Quote on depression: “Sometimes, what a person needs is not a brilliant mind that speaks, but a patient heart that listens.”

Depression quote: “Every day begins with an act of courage and hope: getting out of bed.”

Quote on depression: “Depression is a flaw in chemistry not character.”

Depression quote: “There’s nothing more depressing than having it all and still feeling sad.”

Quote on depression: “It’s really sad how one day I’ll seem to have everything going right then the next day I’ll lose everything so fast.”

Depression quote: “Our sorrows and wounds are healed only when we touch them with compassion.”

Quote on depression: “Depression is like a bruise that never goes away. A bruise in your mind.”

Depression quote: “The primary cause of unhappiness is never the situation but your thoughts about it.”

Quote on depression: “Grief is depression in proportion to circumstance; depression is grief out of proportion to circumstance.”

Depression quote: “People don’t die from suicide, they die from sadness.”

Quote on depression: “She hurts and she cries. But you can’t see the depression in her eyes. Because she just smiles…”

Depression quote: “Depression and I are old friends but I do not court his company.”

Quote on depression: “In a strange way, I had fallen in love with my depression.”

Depression quote:”Sometimes i’m sad and tired and miserable for not reason at all.”

Quote on depression: “What is depression like? It’s like drowning. Except you can see everyone around you breathing.”

Depression quote:”I wish I could go back to a time when i could smile and it didn’t take everything in me to do it”

Quote on depression: “I am living in a nightmare, from which from time to time I wake in sleep.”

Depression quote:”My depression is the most faithful mistress I have known—no wonder, then, that I return the love.”

Quote on depression: “So you try to think of someone else you’re mad at, and the unavoidable answer pops into your little warped brain: everyone.”

Depression quote: “Because wherever I sat—on the deck of a ship or at a street café in Paris or Bangkok—I would be sitting under the same glass bell jar, stewing in my own sour air.”

Quote on depression: “I don’t want any more of this try, try again stuff. I just want out. I’ve had it. I am so tired. I am twenty and I am already exhausted.”

Depression quote: “That is all I want in life: for this pain to seem purposeful”

Quote on depression: “It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. Iwoke up in to a nightmare.”

Depression quote: “Every man has his secret sorrows wich the world knows not; and often times we call a man cold when he is only sad.”

Quote on depression: “I’ll never forget how the depression and loneliness felt good and bad at the same time. Still does.”

Depression quote: “When you’re surrounded by all these people, it can be even lonelier than when you’re by yourself. You can be in a huge crowd, but if you don’t feel like you can trust anybody or talk to anybody, you feel like you’re really alone.”

Insightful quote on depression: “When I get lonely these days, I think: So BE lonely, Liz. Learn your way around loneliness. Make a map of it. Sit with it, for once in your life. Welcome to the human experience. But never again use another person’s body or emotions as a scratching post for your own unfulfilled yearnings.”

Depression quote: “During depression the world disappears. Language itself. One has nothing to say. Nothing. No small talk, no anecdotes. Nothing can be risked on the board of talk. Because the inner voice is so urgent in its own discourse: How shall I live? How shall I manage the future? Why should I go on?”

Depression quote: “The teacher wonders but she doesn’t ask, it´s hard to see the pain behind the mas. Bearing the burden of a secret storm. sometimes she wishes she was never born.”

Insightful quote on depression: “All alone! Whether you like it or not, alone is something you’ll be quite a lot!”

Quote on depression: “The same girl who smiles and talks non-stop, is the same one who cries herself to sleep at night.”

Depression quote: “Numbing the pain for a while will make it worse when you finally feel it.”

Quote on depression by Rebecca Wells: “Can you reclaim that free-girl smile, or is it like virginity- once you loose it, that’s it?”

Insightful quote on depression: “Maybe she laughs and maybe she cries, and maybe you would be surprised at everything she keeps inside.”

Depression quote: “When I cry about one thing, I end up crying about everything that’s messed up in my life.”

Insightful quote on depression and pain: “I wish it would rain all day, maybe that would make the pain go away.”

Quote on depression by Douglas Adams: “I think you ought to know I’m feeling very depressed.”

Depression quote: “Work is always an antidote to depression.”

Insightful quote on depression: “I don’t want any more of this try, try again stuff. I just want out. I’ve had it. I am so tired. I am twenty and I am already exhausted.”

Quote on depression: “I don’t want to see anyone. I lie in the bedroom with the curtains drawn and nothingness washing over me like a sluggish wave. Whatever is happening to me is my own fault. I have done something wrong, something so huge I can’t even see it, something that’s drowning me. I am inadequate and stupid, without worth. I might as well be dead.”

Quote on depression by Elizabeth Wurtzel: “That is all I want in life: for this pain to seem purposeful.”